What are people saying about CALEXIT #1?

Vulture
“Okay, okay, the exposition of Calexit may sound a bit on the nose. After all, it’s a tale about the establishment of a breakaway Californian republic in the wake of a presidency not too dissimilar from our current one. But trust me, it works. There are no easy gags about Californians, no silly jabs at Trumpism, and no over-the-top satire of our current state of decline. Instead, the creators have opted to tell a terrifyingly straightforward suspense story about the intrigues and crackdowns that ensue when governments decay and societies rot. The scariest thing about Calexit is how lived-in it feels — after all, every dystopia is just an accurate description of how things are for other people somewhere in the world, and this story just reminds us that we’re always a hair’s breadth away from the very bad things that we assume only happen in failed states.”
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Entertainment Weekly
“The era of President Donald Trump may be fueling plenty of #Resistance protests, but hasn’t led to any armed uprisings. To see what one might look like, though, search no further than the new series from Black Mask Studios, which features the entire state of California taking up arms against an oppressive government.”
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The Mary Sue
“Calexit is a Must-Read political dystopia with a twist of hope. It doesn’t feel like a depressing, inescapable horror; instead, it feels like a reality that has forced citizens to resist, to fight. Unlike watching the news, Calexit doesn’t leave you feeling weighed down—in fact, it’s just the opposite… political art like Calexit can only help to energize us and inspire us to challenge the current regime.”
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Forbes
“Returns comics to their fascist-punching roots.”
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Paste
“Powerful.”
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The Oregonian
“2017’s Most Dangerous Comic.”
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Comicosity
“Calexit is the new face of resistance in comics, elbowing past incumbents and upstarts alike by prioritizing precision, clarity, and empathy over sound and fury.”
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Salon
“It’s only fair and right that art in all its forms would strike back with unmitigated force. That’s not to say there isn’t subtlety in Pizzolo’s all-too-real fantasy (the ‘what ifs’ in the narrative never shy that far from the news cycle). In the end, it’s the story of very specific, well-wrought characters attempting to navigate through an America that no longer views them as Americans. It’s located and local, a parable that builds up from a valid, often ignored ground-level experience of our country.”
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io9
“Not all of it is as relentlessly grim as it sounds. As well as telling the ongoing story of resistance leader Zora and the battle to free California as its own sovereign state, each issue of the comic will also come with insight into real-world political discourse and activism, featuring interviews with activists small and large about what Americans can do to become engaged in the political process in the run-up to important House and Senate elections in 2018.”
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The Washington Post
“Calexit will focus on such daring characters as a smuggler named Jamil and Zora, a Pacific Coast Sister Cities Resistance leader; the pair escape from an Occupied Los Angeles prison camp, where martial law has been in effect ever since America’s demagogue president signed an executive order to deport all immigrants, and California responded by proclaiming itself a Sanctuary State… Each issue, the publisher says, will include nonfiction content about such political aspects as grassroots campaigning for the 2018 elections.”
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The Hollywood Reporter
“A fascist is elected President of the United States, but loses the popular vote in California by a margin of almost 3 million votes — it’s not a retread of last year’s election, but the inciting incident behind Calexit, a newly announced comic book series from Black Mask Studios that sees California lead the resistance against America’s commander in chief… The comic — which will feature background information about grassroots campaigning and activism in each issue — continues a history of political material from the publisher, which launched with 2012’s Occupy Comics, with titles such as Young Terrorists, Black and The Dregs following.”
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NJ.com
“Throughout history, comics have had a strong undercurrent of political activism, and while most of those titles were published by small underground companies and sold in head shops as opposed to comic shops or on dime store racks, today’s activism has been pushed to the forefront of popular culture. CALEXIT can be found on the shelves of any comic shop and will for sure be found on the shelves of Barnes & Noble when it is collected in trade and in Amazon warehouses, but its roots in the political protest comics of yesteryear shines through strongly.”
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